Publications

"The Home as a Political Fortress; Family Agreement in an Era of Polarization.” With Shanto Iyengar and Kent Tedin. Journal of Politics 80 (4), 2018, 1326-1338
"Economic Expectations, Voting, and Economic Decisions around Elections.". With Gur Huberman, David Rothschild, Masha Krupenkin, and Shawndra Hill. AEA Papers and Proceedings 108, 2018, 597-602
"Who Speaks for Republicans?” With David M. Rothschild. In: John Sides and Henry Farrell (eds.), The Science of Trump. The Monkey Cage. 2016.
"Campaigning Online: Web Display Ads in the 2012 Presidential Campaign." With Andrew O. Ballard, D. Sunshine Hillygus and Tobias B. Konitzer. PS: Politics and Political Science, 49, 3. 2016. 414-419.
Tobias Konitzer, Jennifer Allen, Stephanie Eckman, Baird Howland, Markus Mobius, David Rothschild, Duncan J Watts, Comparing Estimates of News Consumption from Survey and Passively Collected Behavioral Data, Public Opinion Quarterly, 2021
"Ethnocentrism versus Group Specific Stereotyping in Immigration Opinion: Cross-National Evidence on the Distinctiveness of Muslim Immigrants.” With Shanto Iyengar, Stuart Soroka, Nicholas A. Valentino, Ray Duch. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 45 (7), 2019, 1051-1074.
"Mobile as Survey Mode." with David M. Rotschild and Stephanie Eckman. American Association for Public Opinion Research Proceedings. 2017
“Getting Out the Vote in the Social Media Era: Are Digital Tools Changing the Extent, Nature and Impact of Party Contacting in Elections?” With Rachel K. Gibson, Marta Cantijoch, Tobias B. Konitzer and John H. Aldrich. 2016. Party Politics, 22, 3. 2016. 165-178.

Research in Progress

"Tomkins, Sabina; Yao, Keniel; Gaebler, Johann; Konitzer, Tobias; Rothschild, David; Meredith, Marc; Goel, Sharad; ",Blocks as geographic discontinuities: The effect of polling place assignment on voting". 2021.

My Research in Popular Media

Amanda Ripley, Rekha Tenjarla, Angela H. Ye. "The Geography of Partisan Prejudice." The Atlantic, 03/04/2019
Parker, Clifton (Interview for Stanford News). The tumultuous Republican campaign is a phenomenon long in the making, Stanford researcher says." Stanford News, 03/16/2016.